Law school dean discusses Jackson’s first day of interrogation

Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson did well on her first full day of questioning, according to the dean of the University of Baltimore Law School. UB Law School dean Ronald Weich said Jackson had the same approach as Justice Stephen Breyer, whom she would replace. – she was actually committed to him early in his career – and everyone should be careful, it’s history in the making. Tuesday marked the second day of Senate confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Jackson, taking questions from Democrats and Republicans. | RELATED: Jackson Defends Her Case as Federal Judge in Confirmation Hearing “It’s pretty stereotypical in that the Democrats back her up and try to bolster her and defend her from any attack, and the Republicans try to to make holes. I don’t think anyone was very surprised by his answers,” Weich said. “Judicial candidates are not supposed to prejudge cases,” he said. So she agreed to some principles based on Supreme Court principles, but she certainly wasn’t going to telegraph her own votes on future issues. I think she handled the situation very well.” | AP FACT CHECK: Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson’s felony recordWeich said that in addition to being the first African-American woman appointed to the High Court, Jackson has a unique background that makes her qualified for the position.” She has worked, not only in private law firms, but in the Federal Public Defender’s Office. We’ve never had a Supreme Court justice who was a federal public defender,” he said. “More often than not, candidates now come from other court roles – here, Judge Jackson was a practicing attorney, and then she sat on the district court for eight or nine years, so she was a trial judge.” Weich said his confirmation is all but guaranteed because Democrats control the Senate, but he said he thinks the confirmation process has become too politicized and that senators should vote, not based on their political affiliation. , but on the merit of the candidate. | RELATED: Takeaways from Day One of Supreme Court Nominee Ketanji Brown Jackson’s Confirmation Hearings “I hope we can return to a time when the Supreme Court is seen as not being a political branch of government, but we’re definitely there now,” he said. Next session, the Supreme Court is expected to take up some big issues, including the legality of affirmative action in colleges.

Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson did well on her first full day of questioning, according to the dean of the University of Baltimore Law School.

UB Law School Dean Ronald Weich said Jackson had the same approach as Justice Stephen Breyer, whom she would replace — she actually served as a clerk for him early in his career — and that everyone should be careful, it’s history in the making.

Tuesday marked the second day of Senate confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Jackson, taking questions from Democrats and Republicans.

| RELATED: Jackson defends his case as a federal judge in a confirmation hearing

“It’s pretty stereotypical in that the Democrats support her and try to bolster her and defend her from any attack, and the Republicans try to poke holes. I don’t think anyone was very surprised by her responses.” , said Weich.

Weich said Jackson admitted she considers Roe v Wade settled law and believes citizens have a basic right to keep and bear arms under the Second Amendment, but Weich said she should not be criticized for remaining neutral on the issues facing the court.

“Judicial candidates are not supposed to prejudge cases,” he said. “So she accepted some principles based on Supreme Court principles, but she certainly wasn’t going to telegraph her own votes on future issues. I think she handled the situation very well.”

| AP FACT CHECK: The Criminal Record of Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson

Weich said that in addition to being the first African-American woman appointed to the High Court, Jackson has a unique background that makes her qualified for the position.

“She worked, not only in private law firms, but in the federal public defender’s office. We’ve never had a Supreme Court justice who was a federal public defender,” he said. “Most often applicants now come from other court positions – here Judge Jackson was a practicing attorney and then she served on the district court for eight or nine years, so she was a trial judge.”

Weich said his confirmation is virtually guaranteed because Democrats control the Senate, but he said he thinks the confirmation process has become too politicized and that senators should vote, not based on political affiliation, but merit of the candidate.

| RELATED: Takeaways from day one of Supreme Court nominee Ketanji Brown Jackson’s confirmation hearings

“I hope we can go back to a time when the Supreme Court is considered not to be a political branch of government, but we are definitely there now,” he said.

Next session, the Supreme Court is expected to address big issues, including the legality of affirmative action in colleges.

Jon J. Epps